Essence of Dzogchen In the Tibetan Bon Tradition

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Event details

  • Monday | March 14, 2016 to Wednesday | March 16, 2016
  • 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
  • 207 E Lake St. Suite 307, Minneapolis, MN 55408 and LIVE STREAM
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Essence of Dzogchen In the Tibetan Bon Tradition

Minneapolis Teaching and Live Stream

Monday March 14, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Tuesday March 15, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. 
Wednesday March 16, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

The Yungdrung Bon tradition of Tibet recognizes nine ways or paths of spiritual development. Dzogchen (“The Great Perfection”) is the ninth and highest of these nine ways. Dzogchen is the most direct method to understand the nature of our mind and the reality of all phenomena.

Dzogchen has been handed down in unbroken lineages, from Kuntu Sang Po through many great masters and yogis, to us today. These great masters achieved the state of enlightenment and the body of light, by practicing Dzogchen.

There are three major sources of Dzogchen. These are Aa-Tri; Nyen Gyud; and Dzogchen. Dzogchen is divided into three series of teachings, each focusing on a different aspect: the Mind series (Semdhe) focusing on Clarity; the Emptiness series (Longdhe) focusing on Emptiness; and the Unification series (Menagdhe), focusing on the unification of Clarity and Emptiness.

Ultimately Dzogchen teaching guides us to realize that everything is simply a reflection of own true nature of mind. When we learn how to “let it be as it is,” then everything simply liberates itself from within. For this reason, Dzogchen is also known as the path of self-liberation (Drol Lam).

In this series of talks, Rinpoche will introduce us to the Dzogchen view. He will teach us the nature of our mind, and discuss the three aspects of our mind (Zhi, the base; Tsal, the energy; and Rolpa, the manifestation). He will show us how the Dzogchen view makes a difference in our meditation practice and our everyday life.

This series of talks is designed for beginning Bon practitioners, and also for people who have experience with meditation but not necessarily with Dzogchen, Bon or Buddhism.